Future Cities? What a lot of Rubbish!!

Lebanon - Rubbish - The GuardianWith Thanks to The Guardian for this photograph

Rubbish has been flooding the streets of Beirut for 9 months. Failure to deal adequately (or at all) with the products of urban growth and the pressure of increasing population will introduce all kinds of diseases, social unrest and eventually bring a city to its knees. Yet, this is a valuable source of reusable consumables and power.

Go to the link below to see a  video of the situation in all its wasteful extent:
https://www.facebook.com/quartznews/videos/1136079816425719/ 

What is the world’s most vulnerable city?

maliMany cities are fighting a losing battle against the ravages of nature, but is it possible to identify the world’s most vulnerable metropolis? Natural events are notoriously hard to predict – but the prospects for Malé do look particularly grim. For even if its new sea wall continues to be effective, the islands around the Maldives capital are going to disappear before too long. And if they disappear, so does Malé’s raison d’etre.

READ MORE HERE

The Rise of China’s Inland Cities

InlandChinaCoastal cities like Shanghai, Mumbai and New York have traditionally been centers not only of trade but also of commerce, culture, and wealth. They monopolize infrastructure investment and media attention, and occupy the longings of aspirational youth seeking stimulation and opportunity.

The world’s opportunistic inland cities are happy to take the development pressure off troubled coastal cities, and in the past two decades many have done so with the gusto of global ambition.

READ MORE HERE China’s Inland Cities 

Despite expectations, cities in East Asia are becoming denser

hong-kong-street-scene-hamedog-2005When we think of urban expansion in the 21st century, we often think of ‘sprawl’, a term that calls to mind low-density, car-oriented suburban growth, perhaps made up of single-family homes.

Past studies have suggested that historically, cities around the world are becoming less dense as they grow, which has prompted worries about the environmental impacts of excess land consumption and automobile dependency.

A widely cited rule of thumb is that as the population of a city doubles, its built area triples. But our new study on urban expansion in East Asia has yielded some surprising findings that are making us rethink this assumption of declining urban densities everywhere.

Read this interesting article from Sustainable Cities and link to the full report HERE

Link

New Town Development Strategies CoverA big thank you to all those delegates who took part in the Town Planning Strategies workshop in Manila last week.

As promised I provide the PowerPoint presentations for your further information.

If you have any questions or would like to post your own ideas and experiences on this website then do please get in touch. This is an open forum so all contributions are gratefully received.

Links to the YouTube Videos used during the presentation are provided below:

Don’t Panic!

What is a Garden City?

The UK’s First Eco-Town

Smarter Cities

Future Cities

Bill Gates – Water from Waste