Tag Archives: Sustainable Cities

Australia’s largest residential timber building is an affordable housing project

An affordable housing development made from cross-laminated timber (CLT) has opened in New South Wales, Australia making it the largest residential engineered timber building in the country, according to community housing provider BlueCHP.

For More information go to: HERE

 

The Missing Middle in Urban Housing

missing-middle

The mismatch between current US housing stock and shifting demographics, combined with the growing demand for walkable urban living, has been poignantly defined by recent research and publications by the likes of Christopher Nelson and Chris Leinberger and the Urban Land Institute’s publication, What’s Next: Real Estate in the New Economy. Let’s stop talking about the problem and start generating solutions!

Unfortunately, the solution is not as simple as adding more multi-family housing stock using the dated models/types of housing that we have been building. Rather, we need a complete paradigm shift in the way that we design, locate, regulate, and develop homes. As What’s Next states, “it’s a time to rethink and evolve, reinvent and renew.” Missing Middle housing types, such as duplexes, fourplexes, bungalow courts, mansion apartments, and live-work units, are a critical part of the solution and should be a part of every architect’s, planner’s, real estate agent’s, and developer’s arsenal.

FULL ARTICLE HERE

What is the world’s most vulnerable city?

maliMany cities are fighting a losing battle against the ravages of nature, but is it possible to identify the world’s most vulnerable metropolis? Natural events are notoriously hard to predict – but the prospects for Malé do look particularly grim. For even if its new sea wall continues to be effective, the islands around the Maldives capital are going to disappear before too long. And if they disappear, so does Malé’s raison d’etre.

READ MORE HERE

Despite expectations, cities in East Asia are becoming denser

hong-kong-street-scene-hamedog-2005When we think of urban expansion in the 21st century, we often think of ‘sprawl’, a term that calls to mind low-density, car-oriented suburban growth, perhaps made up of single-family homes.

Past studies have suggested that historically, cities around the world are becoming less dense as they grow, which has prompted worries about the environmental impacts of excess land consumption and automobile dependency.

A widely cited rule of thumb is that as the population of a city doubles, its built area triples. But our new study on urban expansion in East Asia has yielded some surprising findings that are making us rethink this assumption of declining urban densities everywhere.

Read this interesting article from Sustainable Cities and link to the full report HERE